Electric Vehicle Range Explained

What affects range?

The range of an electrified vehicle refers to how far it can travel on zero-emissions power. Your driving range in a Ford electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle can be affected by three main factors:​

Heavy Acceleration and High Speeds

Just as in vehicles with an internal combustion engine, accelerating heavily in an electric vehicle uses more power and therefore reduces the overall range. Similarly, travelling at higher speeds creates greater wind and road resistance, meaning you’ll get fewer miles to a single charge. 

Climate and Temperature

Extreme heat or cold can affect battery range. Here in the UK, we’re more susceptible to cold temperatures and, due to the battery’s cell chemistry, it has less energy compared to when the weather is mild. In more extreme temperatures, you’re also more likely to need to heat or cool the cabin for comfort, which also has an impact on range. 

Regenerative Braking

The efficiency of the battery can be improved with regenerative braking, which can capture and recycle over 90% of the vehicle’s braking energy, thereby extending its range.

How to Improve Range


There are several things you can do to improve the range on your Ford electric or hybrid vehicle:

  • Pre-conditioning the vehicle before setting out on your journey means you can create the perfect interior climate while your car is still plugged in. This in turn means you won’t need to use so much energy to get the climate right while you’re on the road.
  • Where possible, plug the vehicle in whenever it is parked.
  • Batteries need time to heat up to be able to accept high charge power, so where possible, avoid using a DC rapid charger following a short journey.
  • Keep tyres inflated to the correct pressure to maximise grip and efficiency.
  • If you’re driving alone, utilise the heated seats and steering wheel where available, as this is more efficient than heating the entire cabin with climate control.